Fertilizer Trucking Availability Increases / Drainage Tile Available for November

Fertilizer Update by Rob Fritz

Rob FritzFertilizer supply in the Twin Cities is still good.  With harvest finishing in the area, trucks are beginning to become more available to bring product back from the Cities.  Pricing has remained flat on all products with no expected increases in the near future. We are still unable to price any 10-34-0 and have no idea when we will see it priced. Call me at 1-800-274-3389. Click here to send Rob an e-mail.

Equipment Tips by Jim Goodale

Drainage Tile Still Available for November

If you are still in need of drain tile, we have access to 4”, 5” and 6” tile for November. 8” and 10” are a little more difficult to get, but we might be able to help you with these sizes, as well.  The sooner you contact us, the more likely we can get the supply you need. Click here to send Jim an e-mail. [table “1” not found /]
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Fertilizer Update / Sprayer Winterization

Fertilizer Update by Rob Fritz

Rob FritzThe fertilizer market has continued to remain stable.  At this point, the most limiting factor to bring fertilizer back from the Twin Cities is trucking.  Otherwise, supply is good at this time.  There are no expectations of any product supply issues for this fall. We are still unable to price any 10-34-0 and have no idea when we will see it priced. Call me at 1-800-274-3389. Click here to send Rob an e-mail.

Equipment Tips by Jim Goodale

Is Your Sprayer Winterized?

I realize many of you may still be working hard on harvest or may be trying to get some fall tillage work started, but I have to ask this question:  Is your sprayer winterized, and is it winterized properly? Here is a checklist for an end of the season sprayer inspection and winterization.
  1. Thoroughly clean and rinse the interior of the tank and flush out the plumbing.  Use a quality tank cleaner.  Allow for circulation through the rinse balls and agitation plumbing.
  2. Drain as much water out of tank and plumbing as possible.  The success of your winterization process is dependent on the amount of water removed.  Excessive water left in the system will dilute antifreeze and reduce its effectiveness.  Drain the solution tank and clean water rinse tank.  Remove all inline strainers and clean them out.  Drain agitation lines and rinse ball lines.  Remove the drain plug from the pump, but remember to reinstall it after the pump is drained.  To drain your line, elevate the spray booms and remove a nozzle check valve at bottom end.
  3. Change all plumbing with RV antifreeze.  Use a minimum of 15 gallons of RV antifreeze on most sprayers.  On some machines, extra large tanks or booms may need more.  Do not use automotive antifreeze.  Some automotive types can damage seals, gaskets and hoses on sprayers.  I like to load the antifreeze in the rinse tanks and move it from there to the product tank through the rinse ball lines and agitation lines.  Then, I pump it from the product tank to the booms one section at a time until I see it spraying out the nozzles.
  4. If you have a foam marker or chemical inductor, these must be winterized too.
  5. Verify that the antifreeze has been circulated through the whole system.
  6. Disconnect the electrical connections and apply a coating of dielectric grease on all the terminals to prevent corrosion.
  7. Wash the sprayer off and use a tank cleaner or a sprayer washdown product.  Chemicals can damage a sprayer from the outside in just as bad as from the inside out.  Inspect the complete machine for repairs for next season.
  8. Grease all pivot points and lubricate any other moving parts.
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Trucking Limits Otherwise Good Fertilizer Supply / Reducing Harvest Compaction

Fertilizer Update by Rob Fritz

Rob FritzThe fertilizer market has continued to remain stable.  At this point, the most limiting factor to bring fertilizer back from the Twin Cities is trucking.  Otherwise, supply is good at this time.  There are no expectations of any product supply issues for this fall. We are still unable to price any 10-34-0 and have no idea when we will see it priced. Call me at 1-800-274-3389. Click here to send Rob an e-mail.

Equipment Tips by Mike Bemboom

Reducing Harvest Compaction

Right now is a good time to think about compaction.  Combines, grain carts and semis with grain trailers are three of the biggest sources of in-field compaction.  Just think – an average class 7 combine weighs about 30,000 lbs.  Put on a 10,000 lb. head and add 350 bushels of 60 lb. corn in it and you’ve got 61,000 lbs. riding on 6 tires – 4 tires if you have singles. A 1,000 bushel grain cart weighs about 11,000 lbs. empty.  With 60,000 lbs. of corn, the cart weighs more than 70,000 lbs.  That’s a lot of weight running across your fields. Tracked tractors, grain carts with tracks and tracked combines will reduce compaction to the ground by spreading the weight over a larger area or footprint. However, it’s almost impossible to eliminate all compaction, and I know tracks aren’t for everybody, so you can reduce excess compaction by trying a few things. First, try not to overload your hoppers, carts and trailers and then drive through the field or down roads. Most of us have seen firsthand how poor gravel road conditions can get because of too much weight.  Second, keeping your in-field high traffic areas to a minimum will reduce unneeded field compaction. Finally, try to avoid wet or soft spots which compact easily and are prone to getting equipment stuck and possibly damaged. Click here to send Mike an e-mail. [table “1” not found /]
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Falling Commodity Prices Stabilize Fertilizer Market / Harvest Safety

Fertilizer Update by Rob Fritz

Rob FritzCommodity prices have taken a pretty large drop, and it has led to a stabilization of the fertilizer market. If we continue to see drops in commodity prices, I do expect to see some drops in fertilizer to follow. We are still unable to price any 10-34-0 and have no idea when we will see it priced. Call me at 1-800-274-3389. Click here to send Rob an e-mail.

Equipment Tips by Mike Bemboom

Harvest Safety

It’s been a dry fall, which makes harvesting easier on lots of things, not to mention more fun. However, it can also increase chances of fire. I’ve already heard of at least three combines catching fire this fall. One way you could reduce fire risk from static electricity is to drag a chain from your combine, usually the middle of the rear axle. Also, most combines have a bracket or defined place for a fire extinguisher. If they don’t, portable extinguishers will fit almost anywhere in the cab. Pressurized water canisters are also effective in stopping small fires or hot spots and have less of a mess to clean up after use. Either way, make sure you have a fire extinguisher or water source close by in case of an emergency. Please call me at our Baltic office (1-800-274-3389) if you have any questions. Click here to send Mike an e-mail. [table “1” not found /]
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